Destinations > Caribbean > Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua and Barbuda History

Flag of Antigua and Barbuda
 

Antigua was first inhabited by the Siboney ("stone people"), whose settlements date at least to 2400 BC. The Arawaks--who originated in Venezuela and gradually migrated up the chain of islands now called the Lesser Antilles--succeeded the Siboney. The warlike Carib people drove the Arawaks from neighboring islands but apparently did not settle on either Antigua or Barbuda.

Christopher Columbus landed on the islands in 1493, naming the larger one "Santa Maria de la Antigua." The English colonized the islands in 1632. Sir Christopher Codrington established the first large sugar estate in Antigua in 1674, and leased Barbuda to raise provisions for his plantations. Barbuda's only town is named after him. Codrington and others brought slaves from Africa's west coast to work the plantations.

Antiguan slaves were emancipated in 1834, but remained economically dependent on the plantation owners. Economic opportunities for the new freedmen were limited by a lack of surplus farming land, no access to credit, and an economy built on agriculture rather than manufacturing. Poor labor conditions persisted until 1939, which saw the birth of the trade union movement in Antigua and Barbuda.

The Antigua Trades and Labour Union became the political vehicle for Vere Cornwall Bird, who was elected as the Labour Union's president in 1943. The Antigua Labour Party (ALP), formed by Bird and other trade unionists, first ran candidates in the 1946 elections and became the majority party in 1951, beginning a long history of electoral victories.

Bird and the ALP were voted out of office in the 1971 general elections that swept the progressive labor movement into power, but returned to office in 1976, winning renewed mandates in every subsequent election under Vere Bird's leadership until 1994 and also under the leadership of his son, Lester Bird, until 2004.

In March 2004 the ALP lost power in national elections that gave the United Progressive Party (UPP) 13 of the 17 seats in Parliament. In the March 2009 elections, the ALP lost again to the Baldwin Spencer-led UPP, which won a slim majority, taking 9 of the 17 seats in Parliament.


Information by U.S. Department of State




Wired Tourist Articles

Retiring in Panama

Affordable real estate, extraordinary sceneries, near perfect weather, a low cost of living, inexpensive labor force and a pensionado program are just a few causes why retiring in Panama is the most excellent. Panama is quickly becoming one of the world's retirement spot.

« read full article »

Philippine Travel: When And Where

When you’re about to embark on a journey to the Philippines, the two most important questions to ask is "when" and "where". If you're traveling to the Philippines, do be aware that the experiences you’re about to encounter is unlike anything you’d encounter anywhere else in the world. Each and every country has its own unique experience to offer you and when you travel to the Philippines, you should expect the same.

« read full article »


Home | Travel Destinations | Travel News | Travel Directory | Volcano Tours | Gallery | Site Index | Contact WiredTourist.com
Follow us on   Follow us on YouTube  YouTube   Follow us on Flickr  Flickr   Follow us on Twitter  Twitter
©2009-2010 WiredTourist.com